Quickly install most CODECs in Ubuntu 10.04

Installing restricted CODECs is easier in Ubuntu 10.04 than in previous versions.

References:

Installing CouchApp on Ubuntu 10.04

CouchApp is a python tool to help develop, upload and clone applications meant for couchDb. Those applications are also known as “couchApps”.

The following recipe is used to install couchapp on Ubuntu 10.04. To use couchapp, you probably first need to install “couchdb”, but this is readily available from the usual repositories.

The issue in installing couchapp on Ubuntu 10.04 is that one needs to rely on some personal packages made available via launchpad.net.

Warning: This recipe installs keys from developers on your platform. From this point on, your platform will trust packages made available from those individuals.

From a high level view, two packages are required:

  1. add-apt-repository: utility tool to easily add a new repository
  2. couchapp : the python tool itself
  3. python-restkit: a python library that couchapp is dependent on

Installing add-apt-repository

Installing python-restkit

Installing couchapp

Use a 24-hour clock in Ubuntu

This note applies to:

  • Ubuntu Lucid 10.04
  • Mozilla Thunderbird 3.0.8
  • Mozilla Lightning 1.0b1

References:

I am a fervent user of the 24-hour clock. However, when I install a new platform, I often accept the default locale of en_US.UTF8. In general, I do not mind this locale. However, applications such as Thunderbird use the locale to adjust the display of various elements, including time. It affects also plug-ins such as Lightning.

This note is a receipt that changes the default time display from 12-hour clock to 24-hour clock.

  1. Edit the default locale file
  2. Add the following line at the end of the default local file:
  3. Reboot the computer… (yeah, it is lame)

That’s it! From then on, applications that follow the locale will display the time in 24-hour clock format.

To verify that you successfully changed the locale, use the locale command:

The entry LC_TIME=en_DK.UTF-8 should be displayed.

Fix VirtualBox host-only network adapter after Linux upgrade

This note relates to:

  • virtualbox-3.2
  • Ubuntu 10.04
  • linux-2.6.32-24-generic

After upgrading the latest kernel, VirtualBox stopped working. More specifically, VirtualBox complained that a host-only adapter, previously available, had disappeared and, consequently, could not start the intended virtual machine that was dependent on it.

The root cause appears to be that the VirtualBox kernel modules needed to be re-generated. Nevertheless, here is the process to fix it:

  1. Reconfigure VirtualBox
  2. Reboot Ubuntu

In details:

After this, VirtualBox performs as expected.

Reinstall Grub2 after installing Windows

This note relates to:

  • grub2 version 1.98
  • Ubuntu 10.04
  • Windows 7

Reference: Ubuntu Guide

If you install (or re-install) Windows after you have been using Linux for a while, you might find out that the disk’s MBR (Master Boot Record) has been overwritten to point directly to Windows. This notes explains how to set up the MBR to point to the original grub.

Here are the general steps:

  1. Boot from Ubuntu Live CD
  2. Figure out which partition holds your GRUB boot
  3. Recover MBR
  4. Add new version of Windows to GRUB

Following are the steps in details.

Find your Ubuntu 10.04 Live CD and Boot from it

Self-explanatory. In theory, any live CD that uses Grub 2 should work.

Figure out boot partition

Using a partition editor, you can review the available partitions and remind yourself the name of the partition where the boot is located. On the Ubuntu Live CD, “gparted” is the command. It is available under the System > Administration menu.

You can add “gparted” in a Debian-based system with the following command:

Restore Master Boot Record (MBR)

Run the following commands, substituting with the correct partition names:

After this, remove Live CD, close tray and reboot. The original grub2 should load.

Add Windows to Grub2

Re-running the “update grub” should allow grub2 to discover Windows:

That should do it. Good luck.