Tethering iPhone 5.1 on Ubuntu 11.10

This blog site already features an note on tethering the iPhone to Ubuntu (http://www.bitsbythepound.com/tethering-iphone-on-ubuntu-11-04-397.html). However, since upgrading to iOS 5.1, when the iPhone is connected to the Ubuntu platform, an error is reported stating that “Unhandled Error Lockdown”.

This note applies to:

  • Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric)
  • iPhone 5.1

References:

The solution offered by this note is to:

  • Install the package repository offered by Paul McEnery
  • Adjust the package repository to be picked up in oneiric
  • Install the necessary packages from the repository
  • Configure

Install Package Repository from Paul McEnery

Adjust Package Repository for use in Oneiric

I applaud the work done by Paul McEnery in providing us the tools to use the iPhone. Unfortunately, the package repository is not available for Ubuntu 11.10. On the other hand, the package repository for Natty (11.04) seems to work just fine for Oneiric. In this step, the package list is modified to point to the Natty version.

While editing the file, replace “oneiric” to “natty” and save again. The resulting file should look something like:

Install Necessary Packages

Configure

The first step of configuration is to tether the iPhone to the platform using the USB connector. Then, run the following command:

Finally, unplug and re-connect the iPhone. The error should not be reported. Instead, all services from the iPhone should be available.

Fix jumpy mouse with PlayOnLinux (wine) in Ubuntu

Since upgrading to Ubuntu 11.10, some games that used to run perfectly using PlayOnLinux started to display unwanted behaviour. In particular, the mouse jumps from the expected position in Starcraft: Broodwar. This behaviour prevents efficient playing. Researching the Internet shows that many other games are plagued by the same problem.

This note applies to:

  • Ubuntu 11.10
  • PlayOnLinux 4.0.16
  • Wine 1.3.18
References:

Many solutions are offered on the Internet which did not work on my system. However, the problem appears fixed in a newer version of Wine. The approach offered in this note is to install Wine 1.4. The latest version of Wine is not yet available via the packages offered by Ubuntu. However, the latest version (beta) is available via the WineHQ’s PPA. The following steps adds a new package repository and updates Wine to the latest version available from this repository. As an interesting note, Wine 1.4 is available via the package named wine-1.3.

After those changes, you can verify the version of the currently installed version of Wine with the following command.

Conclusion

Wine and PlayOnLinux are great tools. The complexity of the task performed by those tools is such that one must expected some unstable versions. This note demonstrated how a user can jump into experimental versions of Wine to access solutions earlier than pushed by the standard packages.